CO2 allowance auction set for September 25

first_imgGovernor says first RGGI auction date is set for Sept. 25CO2 allowance auctions will help drive innovation, produce cleaner energyMONTPELIER – Governor Jim Douglas has announced that Vermont and the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative have released preliminary guidelines for the nation’s first-ever carbon credit auction on Sept. 25.The guidelines outline requirements and preparations bidders must follow to be ready to purchase their share of nearly 12.5 million carbon emission allowances at the first auction.”The stage is set for Vermont and nine other states to take unprecedented action and lead the nation on a path of economic and environmental security through reduced use of fossil fuels like oil,” Douglas said. “This is an important milestone as Vermonters struggle under the burden of the federal government’s failure to lead on fundamental energy and environmental issues.”The Sept. 25 auction is expected to include allowances from Vermont, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland and Rhode Island. Other RGGI states will offer allowances for sale in future auctions as they complete their necessary rule-making procedures.RGGI is the first program in the country to cap and then reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Participating states have agreed to stabilize CO2 emissions from 2009 to 2014, and then gradually reduce emissions beginning in 2015. Emissions from the power sector for RGGI states totals about 7 percent of the U.S. power sector emissions, according to the U.S. Energy Information Agency.The market-based mandatory program will cost-effectively reduce the pollution that is causing global warming while investing in efficient technology, Douglas said. “The result for Vermonters is the potential for new green jobs and cleaner energy.”The materials released today, online at www.rggi.org(link is external), provide a preview of auction applications and procedures for bidders participating in the first of two early auctions to be held this year.###last_img read more

15 stores with the best and worst return policies

first_img 17SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The holiday shopping season is in full swing. As you’re buying holiday gifts and checking off your shopping list, you should also keep in mind retailers’ return policies. There’s a good chance that something from your holiday shopping trips will get returned, since two-thirds (68.6 percent) of consumers indicated last year that they returned gifts most or some of the time, according to the National Retail Federation’s Gift Receiving and Returning report. Fortunately, most retailers offer fair return policies — or 90 percent of shoppers think so.However, some return policies definitely favor customers more than others, GOBankingRates found in its annual survey of retailers’ return policies. Looking at return time limits, receipt policies and other terms, this survey ranked 31 major retailers’ return policies from best to worst. Click through to see the stores that make returns a breeze — and those with the worst return policies.10 Best Return PoliciesThe best return policies make it simple and easy for customers to return or exchange a purchase if they aren’t satisfied. In fact, many of the 10 best return policies place no time limits on returns, and some will accept exchanges and returns even for well-used items.These favorable return policies truly put the customer first, which is a huge help for the shopper struggling with a holiday spending hangover, or a giftee dealing with a haul of unwanted presents. Click through to see the 10 stores with the most generous return policies this holiday season. continue reading »last_img read more