Welch introduces bill to protect dairy farmers by closing trade loophole

first_imgCongressman Peter Welch on Tuesday introduced legislation to protect dairy farmers by closing a trade loophole that allows for the unlimited importation of a form of dried milk product. Welch s bill, the Milk Import Tariff Equity Act, will update existing trade regulations to include milk protein concentrate (MPC) and treat it like all other imported dairy products. In the past decade, MPC imports have more than doubled, undermining the market for domestic powdered milk and driving down the price Vermont s dairy farmers are paid for their milk. As international dairy producers have flooded the American market with milk protein concentrate, Vermont s dairy farmers have paid the price. By circumventing trade agreements, these producers have contributed to the plummeting price of milk and caused many Vermont farmers to go out of business, Welch said. This legislation will simply level the playing field and ensure that all dairy producers play by the same rules.Milk protein concentrate, similar to non-fat dried milk, is used in a variety of processed food products. In the past ten years, MPC imports have increased 58 percent. A 2004 International Trade Commission report found that, imported milk protein products may have displaced approximately 318 million pounds of U.S. produced milk protein [equivalent to 883 million pounds of non-fat dried milk] between 1998 and 2002.Because the technology used to produce MPCs was relatively new at the time, regulations approved during the 1995 Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations neglected to include MPCs. In the years since, foreign producers have taken advantage of this oversight and increased exports at a rate higher than is allowed for other dairy products.The Milk Import Tariff Equity Act would simply close this loophole and ensure that milk protein concentrates are regulated at the same level as other dairy products.Companion legislation was introduced in the Senate earlier this year by Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY).Source: Welch’s office. 9.29.2009last_img read more

Chinese factory activity slows in face of global pandemic

first_imgChinese factory activity grew at a slower pace in April as demand remained sluggish while the world grapples with the coronavirus pandemic, according to official data released Thursday.China is ramping up economic production as daily life returns to normal but with much of the world still facing restrictions on movement and business operations, its factories are facing weak orders.The manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) came in at 50.8, the National Bureau of Statistics said Thursday, just above the 50 mark that indicates expansion. This was well above the dismal 35.7 reported the month before, at the height of China’s virus outbreak.But NBS data on Thursday found that nearly 60 percent of companies surveyed reported “insufficient orders”, and some firms said market demand was weak, with difficulties in product sales and more time needed before orders return. Zhao said some manufacturing companies reported a sharp decrease in newly signed export orders, and even orders that have already started production have been cancelled.”China’s foreign trade faces greater challenges,” he said. Non-manufacturing PMI came in at 53.2 — up on last month and above analyst predictions.Zhao said there had been a “significant rebound” in the catering industry but added that “the resumption of work and production in some industries is still lagging behind”.”Industries such as accommodation, culture, sports, entertainment and resident services have had a larger impact from the epidemic,” he said.Many sporting venues, cultural centers and cinemas have remained closed throughout April.The last time China’s PMI hovered above the 52.0-mark was in September 2017, before the trade war kicked off. Topics :center_img The figure is slightly below expectations of analysts surveyed by Bloomberg, who forecast 51.0.But Zhao Qinghe, senior statistician at the National Bureau of Statistics, warned that demand was recovering at a slower pace than production, in industries including textiles and chemical raw materials.”The spread of the pandemic is accelerating overseas, and global economic activity has contracted sharply,” he said.The latest figures follow surprise growth of 52.0 in March as businesses went back to work following a lengthy shutdown in China, which brought economic activity to a near standstill.last_img read more

Gold Coast waterfront block fetches $2.2 million

first_img26-28 Karina Cres, Broadbeach Waters. 26-28 Karina Cres, Broadbeach Waters sold for $2.2 million.A DOUBLE block on a Gold Coast canal has sold for $2.2 million.The Broadbeach Waters property at 26-28 Karina Cres is 1556sq m with 23m of water frontage.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North11 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoEach block has own street access.The four-bedroom home features living and dining areas, high ceilings, two master bedrooms while outside there is a pool, tennis court, pontoon and boat ramp.Ray White Broadbeach agents Sam Guo and Julia Kuo negotiated the sale. 26-28 Karina Cres, Broadbeach Waters.last_img read more

State officials recommend hepatitis, other vaccines

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — Since November 2017, the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) has been investigating an outbreak of acute hepatitis A virus (HAV). Cases have been infected with HAV strains genetically linked to outbreaks across the United States. Indiana has an average of 20 cases of hepatitis A per 12 month period.Indiana is one of 10 states experiencing a hepatitis A outbreak, and outbreak-related cases have been confirmed across the state. Information on other outbreaks can be accessed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website. Transmission is presumed to occur person to person; no contaminated commercial food product has been identified. Based on CDC guidelines, populations who are homeless, transient, incarcerated or use illicit drugs and their close direct contacts are considered at increased risk of exposure to hepatitis A.To reduce the risk of hepatitis A transmission, people who have not received two doses of hepatitis A vaccine may ask their health care providers for protection. Additionally, always wash your hands with soap and water after going to the bathroom, after changing diapers and before preparing meals for yourself and others. Do not attend work or school if you are experiencing symptoms of hepatitis A, which include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, tiredness, stomach ache, fever, dark-colored (cola) urine, light-colored stool and jaundice (yellowing of skin and eyes). Symptoms may take as many as 50 days from exposure to appear.As families prepare for the 2018-19 school year it’s important to check vaccination records. Recommended guidelines are here.last_img read more