Judge OKs optional anthrax shots for troops

first_img DoD subsequently asked Sullivan to modify his injunction to allow for anthrax vaccinations under the emergency authority. Sullivan granted that motion yesterday, stipulating that the shots have to be voluntary. Sullivan’s ruling came in a suit filed by six military members and DoD civilian contractor employees. In an initial ruling in December 2003, the judge ordered DoD to stop requiring the shots on the ground that the FDA had never specifically approved the vaccine for inhalational anthrax. (The vaccine was originally licensed in 1970.) The FDA responded a week later with a declaration that the vaccine was safe and effective for all forms of anthrax. Sullivan then lifted his injunction in January 2004, little more than 2 weeks after he had issued it. Feb 2 CIDRAP News story “FDA issues emergency order on military anthrax shots” Then-HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson granted the Department of Defense (DoD) request on Jan 14. But the “Emergency Use Authorization” (EUA) said DoD had to make the vaccinations optional. Sullivan had ruled last October that the mandatory vaccination program was illegal because the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in his opinion, did not follow proper procedures in approving the vaccine for inhalational anthrax, as opposed to cutaneous anthrax. He said troops could not be required to take the vaccine, called Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA), without their informed consent or a special presidential waiver. Apr 7, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – A federal judge who stopped the US military’s compulsory anthrax vaccination program last October has ruled that the Pentagon can resume giving anthrax shots, but only on a voluntary basis. In his ruling, Sullivan left the door open to challenges to the legality of the emergency authorization granted by HHS. He said his ruling signaled no “prejudice to a future challenge to the validity of any such EUA,” adding, “The court expressly makes no finding as to the lawfulness of any specific EUA that has been or may be approved by the Department of Health and Human Services.” The Department of Defense (DoD) said it was pleased with the ruling but did not predict when vaccinations will resume. In a brief statement provided by e-mail, DoD officials said, “No vaccinations will be offered until the Defense Department issues detailed implementing instructions in the near future.” District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan in Washington, DC, said yesterday the Pentagon can administer the shots to volunteers under the terms of an emergency authorization granted in January by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Military officials had asked for the emergency authority on grounds that troops in some regions face a risk of anthrax attack. AVA requires six shots over a period of 18 months, followed by annual boosters. Last November HHS awarded an $877 million contract for a new anthrax vaccine that officials hope will require fewer doses and have fewer side effects. The contract went to VaxGen Inc., Brisbane, Calif., for 75 million doses, which are destined for the Strategic National Stockpile of drugs and medical supplies to protect the public. AVA is derived from whole anthrax microbes, whereas the new vaccine contains a purified form of just one anthrax component, called protective antigen. See also: More than 1.3 million people have received anthrax shots in the DoD program since 1998, according to the Pentagon. Hundreds of troops have refused the shots out of concern about side effects, and some have been punished or forced out of the military as a result. Last December, the FDA quietly published a Federal Register notice inviting the public to comment on a proposal to confirm the vaccine’s approval for all forms of anthrax. The deadline for comments was Mar 29. But in his subsequent ruling in October 2004, Sullivan said the FDA had failed to follow its own rules in declaring the vaccine safe for all forms of the disease. Those rules, set up after the FDA took over drug licensing from another federal agency in 1972, included gathering public comments. Sullivan said that the FDA’s declaration relied partly on evidence on which the public never had a chance to comment. In December, military officials responded to the ruling by asking the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for emergency authority to resume the vaccination program. Under the Project Bioshield Act of 2004, the FDA, in a declared emergency, can authorize the use of a medical product that has not gained ordinary FDA approval. Nov 4, 2004, CIDRAP News story “HHS to spend $877 million on new anthrax vaccine”last_img read more

Anti-racism protests turn spotlight on icons of US history

first_imgThe statue, whose pedestal has already been covered with anti-racist graffiti, has held pride of place for a century in Richmond, the Confederate capital during the Civil War.In Washington, a statue of Confederate general Albert Pike was torn down last week.Increasingly, other figures who hold large places in American history are also not safe, and on Monday evening a crowd tried to topple the statue of Andrew Jackson, the seventh president, in Lafayette Park, close to the White House. As the wave of anti-racism protests rocking the United States brings down monuments to figures linked to the country’s history of slavery, the spotlight is shifting to historic characters long considered untouchable.Although protesters initially focused on removing statues of Confederate generals, the movement has begun to turn its focus to icons of US history, including the nation’s founders Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, and President Theodore Roosevelt.The death of George Floyd, a black man, in Minneapolis police custody on May 25 has sparked debate around statues and monuments honoring people central to the US’ slave system, some of which have been pulled down or vandalized. ‘Hurt beyond repair’ Thomas Jefferson, the third US president, has been the target of some protesters, with many statues of the leader vandalized.Even though he was one of the authors of the Declaration of Independence, he also owned more than 600 slaves and viewed black men as inferior to white, according to the website of his Virginia plantation-turned-museum, Monticello.”There are many statues of him that should come down,” wrote television host Shannon LaNier last week in an essay for Newsweek. LaNier is a descendant of Sally Hemings, one of Jefferson’s slaves with whom he fathered several children.Seeing statues “of their ancestors’ slave master, a murderer, or a white supremacist” causes “hurt beyond repair” for many African Americans, LaNier wrote.Even the nation’s father and first president, George Washington, is no longer beyond reproach: he owned 100 slaves at his Mount Vernon plantation, south of the federal capital bearing his name.”Putting a statue in a public place, it’s a form of veneration, and many people now ask why are we venerating people who owned slaves,” said Gallaher.In her opinion, even if the differences between Lee and the Founding Fathers are clear, “they all have slaves, and that’s what bothers people so much.”She noted that other members of the Founding Fathers had “questioned the morality of slavery.” History in museums For Daniel Domingues, an associate professor of history at Rice University in Houston, any monument to Jefferson “should be contextualized with a plaque or added inscriptions.”The city of New York opted for another route, deciding to remove a statue of the 26th president, Theodore Roosevelt, from the entrance of the American Museum of Natural History.The move, decried by President Donald Trump, was due to the judgment that the statue represented colonialist and racist views.The bronze statue depicted “Teddy” Roosevelt on horseback, while a black man and a Native American walked beside him.The museum explained Sunday that the statue “explicitly depicts Black and Indigenous people as subjugated and racially inferior.”The website noted that Roosevelt was considered a progressive environmental defender at the start of the 20th century, but he also maintained racist opinions.”Where do you draw the line, from Gandhi all the way to George Washington?” White House spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany asked Monday.Trump has defended the Confederate monuments and said that removing them would destroy US history and culture.But “erasing the statues is not erasing the past, it should be read as being a part of the history,” Domingues told AFP, noting that American history “is preserved in history books or museums.”Gallaher, who grew up in Virginia, agreed: “People don’t learn their history from statues. You will learn about George Washington even if a statue is not there,” she said.center_img The ongoing protests are “a battle over the narrative of American history in the realm of statues,” Carolyn Gallaher, a professor at American University in Washington, told AFP.”In the South, people decided to venerate confederates. Protesters are saying, ‘No more.'”Slavery served as the economic backbone of the American South until the end of the American Civil War (1861-1865), and has left a lasting mark on both daily culture and stereotypes and perceptions of the region.In Virginia, where some of the first English colonies were established before becoming the heart of American slave country, protesters have called for the removal of a statue of General Robert E Lee, the leader of the Confederate army. Topics :last_img read more

MTB 6th edition commences at Mananthavady in Kerala

first_imgLast Updated: 23rd December, 2019 15:17 IST MTB 6th Edition Commences At Mananthavady In Kerala MTB is organised by Kerala Tourism and it is the first mountain bike race in India to be featured in the MTB race calendar of Union Cycliste Internationale Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00Loaded: 0%Duration 0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio TrackQuality LevelsFullscreenThis is a modal window. This video is restricted from playing on your current domain Error Code: PLAYER_ERR_DOMAIN_RESTRICTED First Published: 23rd December, 2019 15:17 IST Session ID: 2020-09-09:35c7451895ba7b54ed0f3ab Player Element ID: video_player_5f58243dc7251 OK Close Modal DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen SUBSCRIBE TO US Digital Desk LIVE TVcenter_img COMMENT Written By WATCH US LIVE FOLLOW US The sixth edition of Mountain Terrain Bike (MTB) was held at the Priyadarshini Tea Environs in Mananthavady, Kerala starting December 21. It is a two-day mega mountain biking event where the riders will cycle through a five-km stretch at an altitude of 3,000 ft that encompasses terrains containing dirt, rock, and water. last_img read more