Vermont still better than most, but 7 million distressed mortgages drag on US

first_imgThe Mortgage Monitor report released by Lender Processing Services, Inc. (NYSE: LPS), a leading provider of mortgage performance data and analytics, indicates that signs of stabilization in the nation’s home loan delinquency and foreclosure rates remain largely neutralized by the more than 7 million loans in distress.According to the Mortgage Monitor report, the number of loans 90 or more days delinquent (including pre-sale foreclosure) declined 112,184 from 4,186,627 to 4,074,443 between March and April, with the total number of non-current U.S. loans plus REO (Real Estate Owned by banks, etc) just over 7.3 million (extrapolated to represent total mortgage market).Conversely, deterioration ratios remain high, with two loans rolling to a “worse” status for every one loan that has improved and the overall volume of loans moving from delinquent to current status declined to a three-month low supported primarily by “artificial cures” associated with HAMP modifications. In addition, newly delinquent loans (current at year-end and 60 or more days delinquent as of April) have declined from the 2009 levels but still remain extremely high from a historical perspective, particularly within prime product.Other key results from LPS’ latest Mortgage Monitor report include:Total U.S. loan delinquency rate: 8.99 percentTotal U.S. foreclosure inventory rate: 3.18 percentTotal U.S. non-current* loan rate: 12.17 percentStates with most non-current* loans:Florida, Nevada, Mississippi, Arizona, Georgia, California, Illinois, New Jersey, Michigan and Rhode IslandStates with the fewest non-current* loans:North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, Nebraska, Vermont, Colorado, Iowa and Minnesota*Non-current totals combine foreclosures and delinquencies as a percent of active loans in that state.Note: Totals based on LPS Applied Analytics’ loan-level database of mortgage assets.LPS manages the nation’s leading repository of loan-level residential mortgage data and performance information from nearly 40 million loans across the spectrum of credit products. The company’s research experts carefully analyze this data to produce dozens of charts and graphs that reflect trend and point-in-time observations for LPS’ monthly Mortgage Monitor Report.To review the full report, listen to a presentation of the report or access an executive summary, visit http://www.lpsvcs.com/NEWSROOM/INDUSTRYDATA/Pages/default.aspx(link is external).About Lender Processing ServicesLender Processing Services, Inc. (LPS) is a leading provider of integrated technology and services to the mortgage and real estate industries. LPS offers solutions that span the mortgage continuum, including lead generation, origination, servicing, workflow automation (Desktop), portfolio retention and default, augmented by the company’s award-winning customer support and professional services. Approximately 50 percent of all U.S. mortgages by dollar volume are serviced using LPS’ Mortgage Servicing Package (MSP). LPS also offers proprietary mortgage and real estate data and analytics for the mortgage and capital markets industries. For more information about LPS, visit www.lpsvcs.com(link is external).SOURCE Lender Processing Services, Inc. JACKSONVILLE, Fla., June 1, 2010 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/last_img read more

Get Vertical

first_imgPhoto: Paul KellyOutdoors athletes have many different ways of measuring a successful season. Some measure it through competition results; others through personal progression. One overriding commonality that seems to exist among athletes from all sports is tabulating the number of days spent doing what they love.For whitewater kayakers, canoers, rafters, and riverboarders, there is an event that channels this energy while also raising money for a very good cause: the EddyFlower Vertical Challenge. The premise of the Vertical Challenge is simple: team up with other paddlers and drop as much elevation as humanly possible in one month. These teams work together to paddle and record their runs, and rally together to raise money for First Descents, a kayaking cancer camp for young adults.Eddyflower Vertical ChallengeThe Vertical Challenge runs from April 1 to May 2 on the East Coast. Now in its sixth year, the event is as much about the community as the competition. Paddlers of all ability levels are welcome to participate, and last year over 100 boaters spent an entire month chasing water and ticking off runs in the online portal to increase their accumulated total vertical feet.“This competition is growing because people think of it as getting back to the soul of the sport,” says EddyFlower co-owner Justin Bellucci. “It’s all about just getting out with your friends and lapping your favorite runs.”The event this year will be ramped up even more with the presence of an East Coast category as well as the traditional West Coast contingent. The long-standing rivalry between these two paddling meccas will surely come out in the competition, and there will be only one overall winning team.In spite of this competitive aspect, everyone still remembers the root cause for the event: helping those who are struggling with cancer. First Descents is an organization based out of Denver, Colorado, that was originally founded by professional kayaker Brad Ludden.Since its inception, First Descents has created something unique for cancer victims and survivors: outdoors experiences that help them to regain the confidence and self-efficacy lost to the disease. The week-long camps are designed to facilitate happy, natural and organic healing. The camps are also a wonderful place to connect them with others and create lifelong friendships. 2012 will be a huge year for First Descents, as the organization will host over 40 camps in 10 states.The EddyFlower Vertical Challenge raised over $15,000 last year, and is shooting for a much larger number this time around. The donations are tax deductible, and all of the revenue from donors and sponsors goes directly to First Descents.Participants are also competing for some impressive prizes. A number of industry leaders have stepped forward as sponsors, and kayaks, helmets, shoes, and other prizes will be given away at the awards ceremony to the top competitors and fundraisers.last_img read more

Tony-winning alumna inspires future students

first_imgRenée Elise Goldsberry, actress, singer, and USC alumna, has become a beacon of success for the next generation of actors from USC to strive for.Goldsberry was awarded the 2016 Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical for her performances as Angelica Schuyler Church in the Broadway musical Hamilton. On June 12th, 2016, she performed at the Tony Awards ceremony along with her fellow Hamilton ensemble at the Beacon Theatre in New York.She has performed in the production since its inception, as she was cast in Hamilton’s off-Broadway debut in 2015. The show transferred to the Richard Rodgers Theatre on Broadway in August of 2015, and has seen unprecedented commercial and artistic success. Along with her praiseworthy, award-winning castmates, Goldsberry was recognized with a Grammy Award for Best Musical Theater Album for the cast recording of Hamilton. For Goldsberry’s performance, she also won a Drama Desk Award and a Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical.For students like Sasha Bartol, a music composition major who serves as an artistic director for USC’s Musical Theatre Repertory, the opportunity to see Goldsberry perform was inspiring.“I have been lucky enough to see Hamilton, and it was genuinely one of the most exciting theatrical experiences of my life,” Bartol said. “From the moment I walked through the doors, the energy was palpable, because everyone I was with was just as ecstatic to be there as I was.”Goldsberry was born in San Jose, Calif., and raised in Houston and Detroit. After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in acting from Carnegie Mellon University, she graduated from the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music, where she obtained a master’s degree in vocal jazz performance.In 2002, Goldsberry made her Broadway debut as Nala in Disney’s The Lion King. From 2005-2006, she originated the role of Nettie in the Broadway adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Color Purple. In 2007, she played the role of Mimi Marquez in the final Broadway production of Rent.She has also found great success in television and film, with recurring television roles on Ally McBeal, One Life to Live and The Good Wife. She also made an appearance in the comedic film Sisters, starring Tina Fey and Amy Poehler.At the Tony awards ceremony, Goldsberry thanked her family and castmates, noting the collaborative effort. “When one of us win, we all win, because we are one.”In her acceptance speech, she also expressed her gratitude for her family and theatrical opportunities.“I have been praying my entire time to take the opportunity to say thank you to my parents who are here tonight, Ron and Betty … a lifetime of miracles one after another…the Lord gave me Benjamin and Brielle and he still gave me this,” Goldsberry said in her acceptance with her Tony held high.Chris Sampson, USC Thornton School of Music vice dean of contemporary music, reminisced on his experiences watching Goldsberry perform at USC.“Being a very highly accomplished musician — through her studies here — was just one of the skill sets that she was going to be able to leverage,” Sampson said.Goldsberry performance in Hamilton includes songs such as, “Satisfied” and “The Schuyler Sisters,” exploring the relationship between two historical figures, Angelica Schuyler Church and Founding Father Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton — the United States first Secretary of the Treasury — was married to Angelica Schuyler’s sister, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton.“The thing about Renée’s career is that she is multitalented — that is what enables her to have the career she has,” Sampson said. “When I was observing her before, you can definitely tell she was an exceedingly charismatic performer. She really knew how to own a stage and be able to present very compelling performances.”Sampson emphasized how musicians and young artists, especially in the Master’s program, progress and develop over time.“At the time what we’re seeing with students is a work of progress,” Sampson said. “You’re actually seeing somebody start to assemble the skills that will end up resulting in a career, and you never know what the combination of those skills is going to turn out to be.”last_img read more