Joint opposition claims revenge being taken on military

Gunawardena noted that when the world was calling for action on terrorism, the very countries called for action against Sri Lanka for defeating terrorism. (Colombo Gazette) The joint opposition today claimed in Parliament that revenge was being taken on military officers to appease the international community.After submitting a motion to Parliament on the Geneva Resolution, joint opposition member Dinesh Gunawardena said that the Geneva Resolution was a threat to Sri Lanka’s sovereignty. He said that in order to keep those who supported the Resolution happy, the Government had arrested some military officers over allegations they were involved in some criminal incidents. read more

Foster parents are scared to hug their children in case theyre accused

first_imgThe report said children were being denied "the physical or emotional affection they need that helps them to thrive" because carers "had been taught to be fearful of potential allegations" Introducing the report, children’s commissioner Anne Longfield said young children in care “often feel worried and confused about the lack of physical affection they are shown”.Older children were “scathing about their carers’ inability to show them affection or to give them a hug,” she said. Local authorities also prevented children and foster carers making decisions about matters such as ear piercing or haircuts. In one case a foster carer was refused permission to fund a highly intelligent child’s private education, the review said. Carers should be empowered to make more decisions and birth parents “cannot be allowed to veto the ability of foster carers to provide day to day parenting”, it said. Sir Martin also recommended that the Government should consider introducing a national register of carers in order to improve recruitment. Minister for Children and Families Nadhim Zahawi said: “The report gives us an opportunity to celebrate foster care and to recognise the invaluable role foster parents play in the lives of vulnerable children. “We are committed to supporting them in this role, and that’s why we recently announced that we will extend our 30-hour childcare offer to foster children to provide extra help for foster parents.”The Department for Education is due to formally respond to the report later this year.  The report said children were being denied “the physical or emotional affection they need that helps them to thrive” because carers “had been taught to be fearful of potential allegations”Credit:Vladimir Godnik/fStop Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.center_img Foster parents are scared to hug their children in case they’re accused of sexual abuse, a Government report has found. Sir Martin Narey’s review of fostering in England found that guidance for foster carers leaves them afraid of showing affection to the children they look after. The report, co-authored by Sir Martin, the former chief executive of Bernardo’s, and children’s services adviser Mark Owers, said that children were being denied “the physical or emotional affection they need that helps them to thrive” because carers “had been taught to be fearful of potential allegations”. One local authority advises carers to manage physical contact “in a manner which is safe, protective and avoids the arousal of sexual expectations, feelings or in any way which reinforces sexual stereotypes”, advice which the review said was “depressing”. Another fostering organisation’s advice specifically focuses on male carers, telling them they “should be aware that showing physical affection towards children/young people could be misinterpreted and put them at risk”. Male carers are also told to ask children to sit in the back seat if they pick them up in their car because of the “additional risk of allegations”.  The report, which has been published following a consultation with academics, carers and children, criticised the Department for Education for failing to provide clear guidance on the issue. last_img read more