Victoria plans 8% online betting tax

first_img The Australian state of Victoria has today (Monday) revealed plans to introduce an 8% tax for online betting agencies Finance 14th May 2018 | By contenteditor Topics: Finance Legal & compliance The Australian state of Victoria has today (Monday) revealed plans to introduce an 8% tax for online betting agencies. State treasurer Tim Pallas said the tax would start from January 2019 and raise up to Aus$30m (€18.9m/US$22.6m) a year. Should the proposed tax gain approval and become law, this would place the rate in Victoria some way below other states. South Australia announced a 15% tax in July last year, while Western Australia is set to implement the same rate in January next year and Queensland is expected to introduce a similar system. “We’re making sure online betting companies pay their fair share of tax in Victoria,” Pallas said, according to NewsCorp. “We will continue to consult the industry and other stakeholders as we finalise legislation to implement the point-of-consumption tax. “We don’t want to do any harm to that industry.” However, according to Fairfax Media, Responsible Wagering Australia (RWA) said it was disappointed with Victoria’s plans, but did acknowledge the state government’s “consultative approach”. “The online wagering industry already pays a significant amount of consumption tax through the GST, as well as corporate income tax to the federal government,” RWA executive director Stephen Conroy said. “An 8% [tax] does not adequately account for these significant contributions and will result in Victoria having one of the highest effective wagering tax rates in the world.”Related article: Lottoland calls for rethink on Australian laws Regions: Oceania Australia Tags: Online Gambling Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Victoria plans 8% online betting tax AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Addresslast_img read more

RGA ‘supports thrust’ of Labour Gambling Review

first_img RGA ‘supports thrust’ of Labour Gambling Review Legal & compliance Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting The Remote Gambling Association (RGA) has said it supports “the thrust” of the UK Labour Party’s Review of Gambling, which has called for a series of new industry regulations, including banning adverts during live sports broadcasts and blocking bets placed via credit cards.The report, which was co-authored by Labour MPs Tom Watson (pictured) and Jonathan Ashworth MP and can be accessed here, made a number of recommendations to address problem gambling, which directly affects about 430,000 adults across the country, according to the Gambling Commission.Aside from a “whistle-to-whistle” ban on gambling adverts during live sports coverage, the review also said that “regulators, clubs and national sports associations should commit to limiting gambling advertising on pitch-side advertising” and reiterated the party’s stance that English Premier League football clubs should voluntarily avoid shirt sponsorship deals with betting brands.“We are ready to enforce this by other means, including legislation, if clubs fail to agree,” the report said.RGA chief executive Clive Hawkswood, who noted that a recent government review concluded that the evidence did not support further restrictions on advertising, added to iGamingBusiness.com: “We would certainly not be averse to additional advertising restrictions if they are effective in addressing some of the concerns identified in this review.”However, Sky Betting & Gaming CEO Richard Flint said that a blanket ban on ads could remove “a key incentive for operators to get a UK gambling licence and therefore could leave UK customers more vulnerable to disreputable operators”.On the recommended ban on credit card betting, Hawkswood highlighted that it is an issue that has already been raised.“If the evidence and that gathered by the Commission proves the Labour Party’s hypothesis, and it may well do, then we would of course not stand in the way of any necessary reforms,” he said.A series of other measures were proposed, including the development of NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) guidelines for gambling disorder and additional resources, funded by a mandatory levy of 1% on gambling companies to support research and treatment.Hawkswood added: “We agree with the introduction of a new independent statutory levy system to ensure that the National Responsible Gambling Strategy can be funded sufficiently. This is something that we proposed to the government as part of its own recent review process.“The Labour Review proposes that the levy should be set at a rate of 1% of gross profits. We are not in a position to say if that is the right level or not, but it is apparent to all that significantly more must be raised than is possible under the voluntary system which is overseen by GambleAware.”Labour would also limit “online gambling-style games” to over 18s, while local authorities would be given greater powers to prevent clusters of gambling shops on the high street.Hawkswood described the review as “a welcome addition to the debate”, providing “a measured response to many of the challenges we all face”.He added: “Although official research shows that the number of children who gamble is in decline and that it predominantly features gambling activity amongst themselves, the Labour Party is right to identify the changing landscape in the digital world and the report’s authors highlight several areas where additional protections should be pursued.“We hope that these can be taken forward as a matter of urgency.”Image: Chris McAndrew Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newslettercenter_img UK’s opposition party calls for ban on in-play ads and credit card betting AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 20th September 2018 | By contenteditor Regions: UK & Irelandlast_img read more

FOBT and tax U-turn ‘will cost £100m’

first_img The online gambling industry is set for a £100m tax bombshell next year after the UK Government confirmed that FOBT maximum stake changes and the Remote Gaming Duty rise will be brought forward to April.Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright (pictured) said in a statement this afternoon that last month’s Budget commitment to changes being implemented next October will now take place in April. The statement was released on Wednesday afternoon as the Prime Minister and Cabinet discussed the Brexit agreement.Maximum stakes will be cut to £2 while RGD will rise from 15% to 21%.The Government’s decision came after weeks of criticism from backbenchers and the risk of losing a vote on the Finance Bill later this month – which would have been a first Budget defeat in 40 years. Sports Minister Tracey Crouch resigned over the implementation date within hours of the Budget announcement at the start of November.However, while opponents of FOBTs are celebrating the U-turn, the gambling industry is counting the cost.The Remote Gambling Association’s (RGA) CEO Clive Hawkswood told iGamingBusiness.com that the industry now faces an extra £100m tax bill in 2018 after the changes were moved forward.“From an online gaming sector perspective, the decision to bring forward the RGD increase by six months to placate the anti-FOBT lobby merely adds insult to injury,” Hawkswood said.“Nobody seems the least concerned that bringing the timetable forward without any warning or consultation will have the effect of adding up to £100m to the tax burden of online gaming operators next year.”The Association of British Bookmakers (ABB) merely said its members would “comply with the timing that the Government sets for the £2 stake implementation”. It contends that the maximum stake reduction will result in up to 4,500 shop closures and 21,000 job losses.The Government announced that it would reduce the maximum stake to £2 more than six months ago and has since argued that the gambling sector should be given time to prepare for the change. However, Wright said the outcry since the Budget announcement had led to a Government rethink.“After a thorough consultation with interested parties, including charities, campaigners and the gambling industry, across government we reached a decision to make this significant change in October 2019,” he wrote in a statement.“The Government has been clear that protecting vulnerable people is the prime concern, but that as a responsible government it is also right to take the needs of those employed by the gambling industry into account and provide time for an orderly transition.“Parliament has, however, been clear that they want this change to be made sooner. The Government has listened and will now implement the reduction in April 2019.”Accepting that the decision would have serious consequences for the UK gambling industry, Wright added that “the Government will expect the gambling industry to work with it to reduce the effect of any impact on jobs and to support employees that may be affected by this expedited timeline.”The decision was welcomed by BACTA, the trade association for the amusement and gaming machine industry that has been a long-term opponent of FOBTs.BATCTA CEO John White said: “It’s welcome news that implementation of the £2 stake limit has now been brought forward to next April. There was never any justification for it being delayed beyond this point.“This is a victory for common sense. The right decision has been reached, one that is an important step towards reducing gambling-related harm. With the FOBT debate now at an end, we hope the whole industry can now move forward together and work on the shared aims of player protection and creating the most socially responsible environment for gambling in the UK.” FOBT and tax U-turn ‘will cost £100m’ UK gambling industry counts cost as maximum stake cut and Remote Gaming Duty rise are brought forward Finance 14th November 2018 | By contenteditor AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwittercenter_img Topics: Finance Tags: Online Gambling Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

Pearce confirmed for second term on UKGC board

first_imgBingo Trevor Pearce’s four-year term on UK regulator’s board of directors will run from July 2019 until the end of June 2023 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 10th January 2019 | By contenteditor Topics: Casino & games Lottery Sports betting Strategy Bingo Trevor Pearce has been reappointed to the UK Gambling Commission’s board of directors.Pearce’s second four-year term will commence on July 1, and runs until the end of June 2023. He was first appointed to the UK regulator’s board in July 2015.Pearce has a background in law enforcement, having spent 40 years working in local policing and national agencies. He spent the majority of his career working in various specialist investigation and intelligence roles, also serving as director general of both the National Crime Squad and the Serious Organised Crime AgencyAside from his work with the Gambling Commission, Pearce is currently chair of the UK Anti-Doping organisation, as well as a trustee of the learning disability charity Canterbury Oast Trust and human trafficking pressure group Stop the Trafik.Pearce’s reappointment comes at a time when the Commission is seeking to enhance its approach to responsible gambling, with a new strategy due to roll out early this year.The National Responsible Gambling Strategy will come into effect when the regulator’s current three-year strategy concludes in March. The new strategy includes 12 priority actions for the Commission, ranging from consulting a culture of evaluation to piloting intervention.As part of this process, the regulator is inviting contributions towards the new strategy on five priority areas: research to inform action, prevention, treatment, evaluation and gambling businesses. This consultation period will run until February 15. Pearce confirmed for second term on UKGC board Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: UK & Ireland Email Address Tags: Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shopslast_img read more

TvBet at iGB Live

first_img TvBet discusses the new games and developments they brought to iGB Live! 2019. Casino & games TvBet at iGB Live AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 5th September 2019 | By Aaron Noy TvBet discusses the new games and developments they brought to iGB Live! 2019.center_img Topics: Casino & games Slots TvBet discusses the new games and developments they brought to iGB Live! 2019. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

Regulatory trends push revenue and profit down at XLMedia

first_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter XLMedia has put a 10% year-on-year decline in revenue during the first half of the year primarily down to regulatory headwinds, while the digital marketing service provider also saw gross profit slip 9% in the period. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address XLMedia has put a 10% year-on-year decline in revenue during the first half of the year primarily down to regulatory headwinds, while the digital marketing service provider also saw gross profit slip 9% in the period.Total revenue for the six months through to June 30, 2019 amounted to $42.5m (£34.2m/€38.7m), compared to $47.2m last year.XLMedia said regulatory headwinds led to a drop in core gaming activity, citing new regulations in Sweden as a particular issue, with revenue in the country down 23% year-on-year.Aside from Sweden, XLMedia said it was also impacted by new regulation in the Swiss market, where licences for online gambling are only granted to a limited number of operators. As a result, XLMedia said most of its customers have exited the market, which has in turn negatively impacted its performance in the market.In addition, the UK’s decision to increase the online casino tax rate from 15% to 21% hit the provider’s average revenue per user figures.However, XLMedia did note that revenue from its personal finance assets was up from $3.1m to £6.0m, representing 14% of overall revenue for the period.XLMedia also spent more during the first six months of the year, with the $14.5m in expenses being 6% ahead of $13.6m in the same period last year. This was mainly due to higher general and administration costs relating to changes in management and increased amortisation of capitalised R&D costs.First half operating expenses included the first implementation of IFRS 16, a new accounting principle that requires a lessee to recognise assets and liabilities for leases with a term of more than 12 months. This meant amortisation expenses at XLMedia were up from $700,000 to $900,000.R&D costs were level at $700,000 while investments in technology and internal systems developed were down from $4.3m to $4.1m. General and administrative expenses climbed from $10.4m to $11.2m.Gross profit slipped from $31.7m to $28.8m and this, coupled with lower revenue and higher expenses, meant profit before tax dropped by 22% year-on-year from $17.6m to $13.8m.Net income for the first half was also down by 14% year-on-year to $12.2m.“This year has proven to be challenging for both XLMedia and the industry as a whole, as the gaming industry changes and regulates,” XLMedia’s chief executive Ory Weihs said. “However, this does result in the Group having greater visibility, more sustainable revenues and stable earnings.“Whilst we expect this disruption to continue in the midterm, we remain committed to our stated strategy, focusing on publishing. We continue to diversify our asset base, specifically developing our US gambling strategy and the personal finance sector, in which we continue to make good progress with this sector now accounting for 14% of the group’s revenues.”Weihs also took the opportunity to pass on his best wishes Stuart Simms, who will replace him as chief executive next month. Simms, who was appointed to the position in July, will join XLMedia from Rakuten Marketing.“As my last address as CEO of XLMedia, I would like to wish Stuart every success and firmly believe that with the support of the board and management team he will lead the business back to sustainable growth,” Weihs said.This week, it was also confirmed that Yehuda Dahan has stepped down as chief financial officer of XLMedia.XLMedia did not disclose the reasons behind the departure, but did confirm that it will immediately commence a search for a permanent replacement.Liat Hellman, who is currently CFO for XLMedia’s Webpals subsidiary, will take on Dahan’s role on an interim basis while a replacement is sought. Financecenter_img 24th September 2019 | By contenteditor Tags: Online Gambling Regulatory trends push revenue and profit down at XLMedia Topics: Finance Marketing & affiliateslast_img read more

Sucht Schweiz launches RG awareness campaign

first_img Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Marketing & affiliates Swiss addiction charity Sucht Schweiz has launched a new awareness-raising campaign to ensure the country’s citizens are aware of the potential dangers of online gambling. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Sucht Schweiz launches RG awareness campaign Topics: Marketing & affiliates People Regions: Europe Central and Eastern Europe Switzerland Swiss addiction charity Sucht Schweiz has launched a new awareness-raising campaign to ensure the country’s citizens are aware of the potential dangers of online gambling.The campaign launches in the wake of the roll-out of regulated online gaming in Switzerland, targeting the country’s 16 German-speaking cantons. Through a series of humorous TV adverts, it aims to highlight the risks associated with gambling online, using the slogan Spielen ohne Sucht (Play without addiction).It will also look to educate players as to how they can control their gambling, such as by setting time and spending limits or taking regular breaks from playing.A dedicated portal to help problem gamblers and their relatives, SOS-Spielsucht.ch, has also launched, while an anonymous counselling service will be made available.It noted that those afflicted could suffer financial hardship, physical and psychological issues and become distanced from family, friends and professional life. These players tended to be the highest spending customers for gambling operators, it continued, claiming that around 10% of problem gamblers accounted for almost half of all stakes placed with operators.Sucht Schweiz claims that around 192,000 Swiss citizens display at-risk gambling behaviour – though did not disclose the source of this figure – but added that a fraction of this number were likely to have developed problems with their habit.With the new online casino offerings available around the clock, it added, customers could lose track of the time and money spent playing.However, a report from the Swiss Institute for Addiction and Health Research (ISGF), published earlier this month, estimated that 0.2% of the country’s citizens were at risk of developing problems with gambling, based on data collected in 2017.The ISGF went on to suggest that by offering a legal alternative to unlicensed operators, there would be a decline in problem gambling rates in the country.Switzerland’s online casino market opened for business in July this year, when Grand Casino Baden launched its offering, powered by platform provider Gamanza. It has since been joined by the likes of Grand Casino Luzern (partnered with Paf), Casino Davos (Gaming1) and Swiss Casinos’ Casino Pfaffikon Zurichsee (Playtech). 29th October 2019 | By contenteditor Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

Sweden’s BOS blasts government’s approach to illegal gambling

first_img7th November 2019 | By contenteditor Regions: Europe Nordics Sweden Sweden’s BOS blasts government’s approach to illegal gambling Branschföreningen för Onlinespel (BOS), Sweden’s trade association for online gambling, has hit out at the national government’s approach to illegal gaming activities, saying imposing certain restrictions on licensed operators will allow illegal sites to increase their market share.This week, the Swedish Gaming Authority (Spelinspektionen) published figures showing that the share of licensed gambling in Sweden is between 85 and 87%, with the remaining share taken up by the black and grey market.BOS noted that this is below Spelinspektionen’s previous estimate, and it is also lower than the government’s channelisation target that at least 90% of the gambling in Sweden takes place on licensed platforms.The association, which previously raised concerns over channelisation, also said the 85 and 87% share is for all forms of gambling in the country and not just igaming. According to BOS, the channelisation figure in online casino and sports betting is lower than this.“No one that has been paying attention to the political outburst and the astronomical fines on licensed gambling companies can be surprised over this development,” BOS secretary general Gustaf Hoffstedt said. “My assessment is that the reduction is part of a trend. Unless the Government takes forceful action to protect its own reregulation the channelisation is likely to decrease further.”Spelinspektionen has moved to clamp down on illegal gaming activities, handing out a series of sanctions against licensed operators that have breached gambling laws.The government is also currently mulling over proposals to introduce stricter rules for gambling marketing, including a blanket ban on advertising, similar to the new set-up in Italy.In addition, licensed operators in the country may be forced to withdraw certain betting markets, should new regulations come into place. Mooted plans include a ban on betting markets that can be influenced by a single player in a match, such as corners and yellow and red cards.However, BOS has criticised the approach, saying that by forcing licensees to adhere to additional rules and regulations could open the door for unlicensed websites, which do not have to follow the law, to gain a greater market share.“To discuss marketing restrictions for licensed online casino operators in these circumstances, as well as prohibiting certain popular gambling objects shows that the government does not understand the gravity of the situation,” Hoffstedt said.“Such restrictions would virtually mean giving away the Swedish gambling market to unlicensed operators. The government is currently acting as the best friend of the black and grey market and this needs to end.”This week, Spelinspektionen reported a quarter-on-quarter increase in licensed igaming revenue for the three months to the end of September, but saw a drop in overall market revenue for the period.Commercial online gambling and betting, combined with online gaming on ships in international traffic, amounted to SEK3.48bn (£281m/€327m/$362m), up from SEK3.48bn in the second quarter. Overall gambling revenue during the came in at SEK5.90bn, which is lower than SEK6.11bn in Q2. Tags: Online Gambling Email Address Topics: Legal & compliance AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Legal & compliance Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Branschföreningen för Onlinespel (BOS), Sweden’s trade association for online gambling, has hit out at the national government’s approach to illegal gaming activities, saying imposing certain restrictions on licensed operators will allow illegal sites to increase their market share.last_img read more

Playtech signs tech deals with Mansion and OPAP

first_img Tags: Online Gambling Playtech has entered into a new digital sports betting partnership with Greek operator OPAP, while the gambling technology giant has also signed an extension to its long-term agreement with online gaming operator Mansion. Playtech signs tech deals with Mansion and OPAP Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Casino & games Sports betting Tech & innovation Casino & gamescenter_img Email Address Playtech has entered into a new digital sports betting partnership with Greek operator OPAP, while the gambling technology giant has also signed an extension to its long-term agreement with online gaming operator Mansion.Under the deal with OPAP, the Playtech BGT Sports (PBS) division will provide the operator with its new Quantum sports betting digital platform.OPAP will become the first operator to use the PBS digital sportsbook offering as part of its Quantum roll out. PBS said the new platform will help OPAP to tap into new opportunities in, as well as provide its with a toolkit to view and manage its sports betting operations.PBS already provides software and services across OPAP’s retail network, as well as over the counter points of sale, as part of a deal agreed in 2017.“The introduction of the PBS platform, across all of our retail betting outlets in Greece, has been a critical element in the improvement and growth of OPAP’s retail sports betting performance,” OPAP chief executive Damian Cope said.“We are therefore pleased to be expanding our partnership with the adoption of the Quantum digital platform, which will provide OPAP with a number of exciting new opportunities.”PBS chief executive Armin Sageder added: “The result of over two years of development, we have no doubt that Quantum Digital will prove to be a growth driver for OPAP throughout 2020 and beyond. We look forward to a continued successful relationship together for many years to come.”Meanwhile, Playtech has agreed a five-year extension to its deal with Mansion, taking the partnership through to at least 2025.Playtech will extend its collaboration with Mansion in the UK and Italy, adding a new, dedicated casino tab on Mansion’s flagship Casino.com brand. Mansion also recently committed to a bespoke live casino studio space in Playtech’s Eurolive facility, featuring live roulette and blackjack.Mansion chief executive Karel Manasco said: “Our long-standing partnership with Playtech has been built on a strong and successful relationship. With Playtech’s track record of innovation in this area, their engaging content will provide more choice to our growing portfolio and we’re very excited to continue this partnership.”Playtech’s chief operating officer Shimon Akad added: “Mansion’s decision to extend its partnership with us comes at a very exciting time in terms of product development, particularly with the development of our Engagement Centre and Player Journey technology.“It’s fantastic to see such a key partner like Mansion actively investing time in utilising new customer engagement tools to deliver an enhanced, personalised player experience.” 3rd February 2020 | By contenteditor AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more

GambleAware defends role as key RG funding body

first_img GambleAware’s board of trustees has responded to recent calls for changes to the funding of gambling research, education and treatment (RET) after questions were raised over the independence of its approach.This comes after the House of Lords Gambling Select Committee urged it to correct an “anomalous” system of funding that blocked charities from raising money from other sources.That same week a letter published by a number of high profile academics in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) criticised a perceived lack of independence in RET funding. The academics argued that a statutory levy should be imposed, and administered by UK Research and Innovation and the National Institute for Health Research.Responding to the Lords’ committee, GambleAware chief executive Marc Etches pointed out that treatment providers it commissions are entirely free to raise funds for whatever purpose they deem appropriate.“This is borne out by their accounts, which show various sources of funding other than GambleAware,” he said.“However, trustees do make a stipulation against duplicate funding, ie treatment providers should not seek to get paid twice over for the same activity,” he added. “Trustees seek this assurance so that the charity’s resources are being used for their intended purpose, which is a matter of best practice.”Etches noted that the report appeared to be concerned that funding processes currently “prevents new activities from being funded at all by ensuring that in practice no additional funds can be raised”.This, he said, was not the case, explaining that GambleAware “welcomes all worthwhile new activities, whether funded by itself or by a third party”.“Moreover, in the interests of building a system that is accessible to all those who need help, we encourage innovation and promote collaboration and co-ordination between organisations and between activities.”Responding to the BMJ letter, Kate Lampard and Professor Siân Griffiths, chair and deputy chair of GambleAware’s board of trustees respectively, addressed claims that the industry was able to regulate the availability and distribution of funds to address gambling harm.“GambleAware has a proud record as an independent charity commissioning prevention and treatment services in England, Scotland and Wales underpinned by research and evaluation,” they wrote.“Guided by an independent expert Board of trustees, the majority of whom work in the health sector, we have established a range of governance processes and procedures that ensures the industry has no influence over our commissioning decisions.”They explained that GambleAware had long been advocating for gambling to be acknowledged as a public health issue must be treated holistically. They also highlighted its support for the Lords committee’s recommendation that the National Health Service and other statutory health bodies should work in partnership with charities to provide treatment, allocate resources and refer patients.“Only then will appropriate referral routes and care pathways be in place to ensure those individuals in need of support, including treatment, can receive the right intervention at the right time,” they said.While the letter criticised the seemly random nature of current industry funding, with reference to the £100m pledge by Betting and Gaming Council members to treat gambling harms, GambleAware looked to highlight the good this money could do.“[The] recent £100m pledge from gambling operators will help us maintain this work in prevention and treatment to keep people safe from gambling harms,” Lampard and Griffiths added. “We will continue to make sure funding is allocated efficiently and independently, as would be expected of other health and social care commissioning and grant-making bodies.”Earlier today GambleAware announced a new awareness raising drive to higlight key symptoms of problem gambling among men aged 25 to 54 years old. This looks to build on its Bet Regret campaign, and make more people aware of treatment resources such as the National Gambling Treatment Service and National Gambling Helpline. Email Address 8th July 2020 | By contenteditor Regions: UK & Ireland GambleAware’s board of trustees has responded to recent calls for changes to the funding of gambling research, education and treatment (RET) after questions were raised over the independence of its approach. Topics: Legal & compliance Peoplecenter_img GambleAware defends role as key RG funding body Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Legal & compliancelast_img read more