Dead & Company Separates ‘Sugar Magnolia’ For Smokin’ Alpine Finale [Full Audio/Video/Setlist]

first_imgDead & Company wrapped up a two-night run at the famed Alpine Valley Music Theatre in style last night, playing their hearts out for a great performance with countless Grateful Dead classics. Powered by three of the band’s core members, Bob Weir, Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, Dead & Company are carrying the torch with a gusto. Perhaps it’s the new energy that John Mayer, Oteil Burbridge and Jeff Chimenti bring to the table, but there’s no denying that this band has some magic.Unlike the first night of the Alpine run, where Dead & Co debuted two new songs, the band focused on familiar tunes with a passion. Opening with “Samson & Delilah,” the first set was heated up by “Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodeloo,” “Loose Lucy,” “Standing On The Moon,” “Crazy Fingers,” “Althea” and a sing-along of “Goin Down The Road Feelin’ Bad” that featured vocals from Burbridge.Set two had the biggest surprise of the night, as the band opened the set with “Sugar Magnolia” but segued into “Viola Lee Blues” before playing the “Sunshine Daydream” coda. The set raged on with a great “Scarlet > Fire” combination and wrapped into a psychedelic “Drums/Space” odyssey, before returning with “Wharf Rat.” Only after “Wharf Rat” would the band conclude their opening song, hitting the “Sunshine Daydream” section in stride.The encore brought two emotional Jerry Garcia tunes to light, as the band brought out acoustic guitars and played “Ripple.” With a little time left, the band broke out into one more song, a great “Touch Of Grey,” to end the show.Check out video highlights [from velvethammer2002 except where indicated], audio via WMWV Radio, and the full setlist below!Crazy FingersAltheaDrums/SpaceWharf Rat [via zoothorn99]RippleTouch Of Grey [via thisspaceisgettinghot] Edit this setlist | More Dead & Company setlistslast_img read more

SPORT-PAK-REAX 2 LAST

first_imgFormer Test opener and head coach Mohsin Khan said Former Test opener and head coach Mohsin Khan said Pakistans defeat in the third ODI was very disappointing. “Where are we going in this format. It is going to be a big challenge now for coach Mickey Arthur to replicate his success of the Test matches into limited over cricket,” he said. Mohsin felt that Arthur needed to think hard on how he could change the fortunes of Pakistan in ODI cricket. “It is going to be a tough test for him. While we have a settled Test side and are number one, it is exactly the opposite in ODI cricket,” he lamented. The series defeat has left Pakistan in a precarious position as they were already languishing at ninth position in the ICC ODI rankings before the start of the rubber in England. A source in the PCB told PTI that a meeting would be held before the team leaves for UAE for the home series against the West Indies. “The meeting will be held once the two top PCB officials, Shaharyar Khan and Najam Sethi also return from England. But indications are that the board might now be forced into dropping its support for Azhar,” the source said. PTI Cor CM CMlast_img read more

Huawei Honor 6X gets price cut, still can’t beat Xiaomi Redmi Note 4

first_imgHuawei’s spin-off brand Honor launched the Honor 6X in India in January at a starting price of Rs 12,999 for the base 3GB RAM model going all the way up to Rs 15,999 for the top-end 4GB RAM model. On Tuesday, the brand announced that the Honor 6X will be available at a discounted price of Rs 11,999 and Rs 13,999 respectively. It’s not a bad price considering that the Honor 6X is (still) very much a jack of all trades, which means that it is quite good actually. But, it isn’t the best. The Redmi Note 4 from Xiaomi is a better buy. Not to mention, that the Redmi Note 4 is more affordable as well.Both the Redmi Note 4 and the Honor 6X look like expensive phones, but both of them aren’t expensive at all. The Redmi Note 4 is, without a doubt, the better looking of the two. With its curved 2.5D glass and polished antenna lines, Xiaomi’s phone looks distinctly different and distinctly (more) premium than Honor’s 6X. Xiaomi’s phone also holds an edge in terms of all-round build and form factor. The Redmi Note 4 weighs in at just over 160 grams, which isn’t quite that much when you consider the fact that it’s housing a 4,100mAh battery inside. What is remarkable, however, is that even though it crams in such a big battery inside, the phone feels practically the same no matter how you hold it.The Honor 6X may not be as good-looking but it is certainly more ergonomic. Unlike a phone like the Redmi Note 4, the Honor 6X comes with more dramatic curves on the rear and a front panel that sticks out as flat as a pancake. The phone, as a result, feels sharp(er) in the hands when you hold it for the first time. The design then grows on you, so much so that you start to appreciate it. No other smartphone at its price point offers better ergonomics, after all. Sadly, its build quality remains questionable. The Honor 6X maybe an all-metal phone but it doesn’t actually feel like one. It feels plastic in the hands, something which is accentuated (even) further when you apply a little bit of pressure on its backside. The Redmi Note 4 feels much sturdier.The Honor 6X’s screen-to-body ratio also leaves a lot to be desired. In fact, Honor’s new phone has some of the chunkiest bezels in (and around) its price point. The Redmi Note 4, in comparison, offers slimmer bezels and hence more real estate.The 5.5-inch 1080p IPS LCD display on-board the Redmi Note 4 does well most of the time unless you’re out and about in direct sunlight. Its (above) average brightness levels feel lacking when you’re out and about. Also, the screen is prone to reflection which adds up, hampering the phone’s outdoor legibility further. But, the screen of the Redmi Note 4 handles — and reproduces — colours so well you don’t mind that it’s not as bright as the company’s more expensive phones.The 5.5-inch 1080p display on-board the Honor 6X meanwhile gets pleasantly bright and viewing angles are also quite good. The two when put together ensure the phone is perfectly usable under direct sunlight. At the same time, because the phone uses an LTPS panel, it runs cooler than standard LCD-toting phones (for instance, the Redmi Note 4). Sadly, colour accuracy leaves a lot to be desired. They appear washed out, or more precisely, lacking in contrast when compared to a phone like the Redmi Note 4.The Honor 6X is powered by a 2.1GHz octa-core HiSilicon Kirin 655 processor clubbed with Mali-T830MP2 GPU. The phone comes with up to 4GB of RAM and up to 64GB of internal memory. Expandable storage — of up to 256GB — is supported via a hybrid micro-SD card slot. The Redmi Note 4 is meanwhile powered by a 2GHz octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 625 processor clubbed with Adreno 506 GPU. The Redmi Note 4 is available in three versions: 2GB RAM and 32GB memory, 3GB RAM and 32GB memory, and another with 4GB RAM and 64GB memory. All the versions of the Redmi Note 4 support expandable storage of up to 128GB via a hybrid microSD card slot.Unlike a phone like the Redmi Note 4 (Qualcomm Snapdragon 625) which uses a chipset built on the power-efficient 14nm finfet process, the custom-built Kirin 655 which is inside the Honor 6X is based on a 16nm finfet process. Both the chipsets are however guided by the same principle, which is, attaining higher clock speeds without overheating and draining the battery quickly. There are (of course) differences but for most users it would all narrow down to this: you’re more likely to get (much) better battery life and little (or no) overheating in phones powered by a chipset on the lines of a Snapdragon 625 or a Kirin 655. Honor holds an edge (over Xiaomi) however, in that — just like Apple — it has complete control over both its hardware and software which invariably should entail in better all-round optimisation. Better all-round optimisation means Honor’s phone should ideally be the smoothest of the lot. It is, but, only marginally.Both the phones are quick and responsive in every sense of the word. Xiaomi’s phone, however, holds a slight edge when it comes to GPU-intensive gaming because the Adreno 506 GPU inside it is slightly more potent than the Mali GPU inside the Honor 6X. The Honor 6X is, as a result, prone to some occasional lags while playing graphical games at maxed out settings for longer periods.The Honor 6X runs Android 6.0 Marshmallow-based EMUI 4.1. An update to Android Nougat (EMUI 5) is already out for the phone in question. It will allow you to access an app drawer for one, among other things. The Redmi Note 4, on the other hand, comes with Android Marshmallow-based MIUI and an update to Android Nougat is also in the cards. Huawei’s Emotion UI may not be as visually appealing as Xiaomi’s MIUI, but it is feature packed to the brim, and is very, very slick provided you’re the kind of person who’s as curious as a cat and likes to dig into things. The Emotion UI has a number of useful Easter eggs scattered all across its length and breadth. Some of the notable features of Xiaomi’s MIUI are scrollable screenshots, second space and dual apps. Additionally, the Redmi Note 4 comes with an IR-blaster that can be used (in tandem with the Mi Remote app or even some third-party solutions) to control smart home appliances.Both the phones support 4G LTE and dual-SIM connectivity. The single speaker out on-board the Honor 6X – that supports DTS audio as well – is louder in comparison to the one on-board the Redmi Note 4.The Honor 6X comes with not one, but two cameras on the rear. On the front it comes with an 8-megapixel camera. The dual camera setup consists of a 12-megapixel + 2-megapixel setup assisted with phase detection autofocus and LED flash. While the 12-megapixel lens is what you can a regular lens, the 2-megapixel lens is capable of depth sensing so users can attain software-enhanced background blur in photos post clicking a shot. The dual rear camera system on-board the Honor 6X can assist (only) in achieving fancy bokeh effects in shots both before and after taking a shot. The second 2MP sensor springs into action only when you hit a dedicated wide aperture mode that sits up top in the camera app at all times. It works best when your subject is within 2 metres. It works even better when it’s in isolation and the subjects in the background are at some distance. It works really well when everything’s in place, which means you’ll have to be absolutely committed to it if you’re looking for good results. The 12-megapixel primary lens however clicks only above-average photos even in ideal lighting. Dynamic range leaves a lot to be desired and photos are often marred by metering (underexposure) issues. Although some of these photos look brilliant on the phone, when viewed on full-screen these tend to have noise, the level of which rises even further as the intensity of light decreases.The Redmi Note 4, on the hand sports a 13-megapixel camera on the rear with f/2.0 aperture, phase-detection autofocus along with a dual-LED (dual-tone) flash. On the front, you get a 5-megapixel snapper. The phone captures some good-looking photos — with occasional softness — in good light with good amount of detail and mostly spot-on (if a little oversaturated) colours. Dynamic range could have been better but it’s still better in than something that the Honor 6X offers. Also, the Redmi Note 4, surprisingly, does well in macro photography scenarios which means close-up shots come out well (enough) when the light is adequate. Xiaomi’s new phone is also able to capture well to-do photos — with occasional softness — in tricky light situations with good detail.The Redmi Note 4 is backed by a massive 4,100mAh battery, which is non-removable. Moderate to extreme usage saw us cross the one whole day barrier with ease, while toning down further should get most users one and a half to two days out of the phone. Extreme usage scenarios got us close to 15 hours on the Redmi Note 4, which is phenomenal. The 3,340mAh battery inside the Honor 6X may not last you as long as the massive 4,100mAh battery inside the Redmi Note 4. But it is no slouch either. Moderate to extreme usage saw us cross the one whole day barrier with ease, while toning down further should get most users one and a half days out of the phone. Extreme usage scenarios got us close to 11 hours on the Honor 6X, which is not bad at all.Both the phones are very dependable and very value for money. But, the Redmi Note 4 is slightly better. Xiaomi’s phone offers a better screen, better all-round performance, better set of cameras and better battery life. The Honor 6X is not very far behind but, it is, marginally.advertisementadvertisementadvertisementAlso Read: iOS 11 at WWDC 2017: 11 features that make it Apple’s biggest iOS update to datelast_img read more