Dead & Company Separates ‘Sugar Magnolia’ For Smokin’ Alpine Finale [Full Audio/Video/Setlist]

first_imgDead & Company wrapped up a two-night run at the famed Alpine Valley Music Theatre in style last night, playing their hearts out for a great performance with countless Grateful Dead classics. Powered by three of the band’s core members, Bob Weir, Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, Dead & Company are carrying the torch with a gusto. Perhaps it’s the new energy that John Mayer, Oteil Burbridge and Jeff Chimenti bring to the table, but there’s no denying that this band has some magic.Unlike the first night of the Alpine run, where Dead & Co debuted two new songs, the band focused on familiar tunes with a passion. Opening with “Samson & Delilah,” the first set was heated up by “Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodeloo,” “Loose Lucy,” “Standing On The Moon,” “Crazy Fingers,” “Althea” and a sing-along of “Goin Down The Road Feelin’ Bad” that featured vocals from Burbridge.Set two had the biggest surprise of the night, as the band opened the set with “Sugar Magnolia” but segued into “Viola Lee Blues” before playing the “Sunshine Daydream” coda. The set raged on with a great “Scarlet > Fire” combination and wrapped into a psychedelic “Drums/Space” odyssey, before returning with “Wharf Rat.” Only after “Wharf Rat” would the band conclude their opening song, hitting the “Sunshine Daydream” section in stride.The encore brought two emotional Jerry Garcia tunes to light, as the band brought out acoustic guitars and played “Ripple.” With a little time left, the band broke out into one more song, a great “Touch Of Grey,” to end the show.Check out video highlights [from velvethammer2002 except where indicated], audio via WMWV Radio, and the full setlist below!Crazy FingersAltheaDrums/SpaceWharf Rat [via zoothorn99]RippleTouch Of Grey [via thisspaceisgettinghot] Edit this setlist | More Dead & Company setlistslast_img read more

Free pine straw

first_imgMowing. Contoured pine strawislands, with just a few plants, can replace large areas ofhigh-maintenance lawn. Where you already have groups of shrubs ortrees, use pine straw to tie them together, he said. Then youwon’t have to mow around them individually.Watering. Sunshine and windwill take away much less water if the soil surface is coveredwith mulch, he said. Reduce water needs with pine straw mulcharound shrubs and in flower beds.Weeding. Mulches help controlweeds, he said. That provides two advantages: One, you don’t haveto pull weeds yourself. And two, you don’t have to spray chemicalherbicides around your yard. Extension foresters say pine straw actually falls year-round. Butneedle-fall is heaviest in fall, winter and early spring.If you have more pine straw than you can use in the fall, justfind an out-of-the-way place to pile it up and save it.Next spring, you could be happy you did. For all the reasons it’sso good in your landscape, pine straw can be just as valuable asa mulch in your vegetable garden.It can help keep the soil moist in small gardens, raised bedgardens or small beds of vegetable plantings. It can be good formulching small fruits, too, such as strawberries or blueberries.It can also help keep soil from washing from heavy rains,Westerfield said. That protects water quality and keeps you fromhaving to repair eroded areas.Here are some tips, he said, to help make the most of your pinestraw.Don’t replace. Replenish. One ofthe benefits of mulching, he said, is the organic matter it addsto the soil as it decomposes. Don’t remove the old straw. Justadd new straw on top of the old to make a layer at least 2 to 4inches thick. That’s the least it will take to be effective.Don’t pile it on too thick. “Idon’t know that it will hurt so much,” Westerfield said. “But anymore than about 6 inches just won’t do any more good.”Leave room around the stems.Especially with azaleas, he said, mulch piled up around the stemscan lead a second root system to develop. That often happens atthe expense of the deeper roots, which leaves the azalea evenmore susceptible to drought damage.Don’t just stuff it underneath.Spread it beyond the drip line, the line right under theoutermost leaves. Getting it over the feeder roots is the key, hesaid.Mulch young trees. It’s reallyimportant in the first two or three years, he said. Withshallow-rooted trees like dogwood, redbud or crape myrtle it’sgood to mulch even after that.Don’t use landscape fabric under thestraw unless your main purpose is complete weed control.If that’s the case, you won’t need as thick a layer of straw.In most cases, Westerfield said, pine straw that’s 2 inches deepafter it settles does 90 percent of what you’d expect the fabricor plastic liner to do. And 4 to 5 inches of fresh straw willsettle to about 2 inches.(Dan Rahn is a news editor with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) By Dan RahnUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgia pines have started raining pine straw early this year.And yes, somebody has to rake it all up. But pine straw can bemore of a blessing than a chore, said University of Georgiaspecialist Bob Westerfield.”If you use it right, pine straw can actually help you have lessyard work to do,” said Westerfield, a UGA Cooperative Extensionconsumer horticulturist.Pine straw can free you, he said, from having to do so much:last_img read more