Bob Weir Covers Lady Gaga And More During Intimate Solo Acoustic Show [Full Video]

first_imgLast night, Bob Weir played an intimate solo acoustic set at Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley, California. During the performance, Weir ran through a number of covers, including Robert Johnson’s “Walkin’ Blues” toward the start of the set, later performing Lady Gaga’s “Million Reasons” and Daniel Lanois’ “The Maker” to close it out. In between, he played the Grateful Dead classics, “Loose Lucy” and “Peggy-O”, as well as two songs off his recently released solo album, Blue Mountain, the title track and “Only A River.”Bob Weir Surprise Guests With Jim James Two Nights In A Row For Dead Tunes & More [Videos]His performance was an intimate affair, and Weir laid out heartfelt renditions of the songs across the evening, taking moments to chat with the crowd. Notably, following “Only A River,” as he was tuning, Weir dived into an anecdote about how he secured the guitar he was playing—a Martin 0017 from 1936. “So, maybe 10 years ago I was looking at the want ads in the clinical and I saw a Martin 0017. I always wanted one of those—they’re great little blues guitars. So I went over to somewhere in Oakland, I think, and I picked it up for $1,100 bucks. The neck was pulled off the body, so you couldn’t really play the guitar, so it could have been less. [laughs] It was a Martin, so I sent it back to the Martin factory. They happily reset the neck and sent it back to me in the proper plastic, but really protective case, and you really need a good case for this one. Did you know this was made in 1936?” After pausing for a moment to focus on tuning, Weir continued, “But, out of tune is out of tune,” eliciting laughter from the audience.Trey Anastasio Joins Bob Weir At Wanee For Acoustic Dead, Phish, And Lady Gaga Covers [Full HD Video]After the fan-favorite “Peggy-O,” Weir warned that “This next one I’ve never even attempted to sing all the way through.” The song was Lady Gaga’s “Million Reasons,” a number that got much press after Bob Weir debuted the cover with Trey Anastasio at Wanee Festival back in April. At Wanee, during Anastasio’s surprise five-song acoustic sit-in, the two iconic jam figures alternated between lead and harmony vocals. Given that this was his first run through of the song solo, Weir performance went well, and the cover fit seamlessly into his acoustic set.Lady Gaga Expresses Her Excitement About Bob Weir And Trey Anastasio’s “Million Reasons” CoverYou can check out an extended live video from Bob Weir’s solo acoustic show in Mill Valley last night, courtesy of Paul Winston. Enjoy!Setlist: Bob Weir | Sweetwater Music Hall | Mill Valley, CA | 9/13/2017 Set: Walkin’ Blues (Robert Johnson cover), Loose Lucy, Blue Mountain, Only A River, Peggy-O, Million Reasons (Lady Gaga cover), The Maker (Daniel Lanois cover) [Photo: Steve Rose]last_img read more

Viterbi develops method to detect breast cancer

first_imgIn conjunction with the Vitebri School of Engineering, Mahta Moghaddam, a professor of electrical engineering, and her research team are working on new imaging and treatment for breast cancer through the use of microwaves.Breast cancer will affect one in eight women, and it is the second leading cause of death in women, according to the National Breast Cancer Foundation’s website. Though risk factors have been identified for breast cancer, researchers are usually unable to pinpoint a single cause of breast cancer.Research Assistant Professor John Stang, technical lead for the project, noted how past research showed opportunities to use microwaves to both treat and detect breast cancer. He has been working on this project for almost four years.“Our research started out of research that was done in the late ‘80s or early ‘90s, showing contrast that existed in the microwave properties of breast cancer,” Stang said.He stressed how breast cancer research is often motivated by emotional intentions.“Everyone has their own personal relationship with breast cancer, so I think that’s also part of the appeal [of the project],” Stang said.Stang explained exactly how this new system is utilizing microwaves.“The system that we are working on now is a combined imagery and therapy system. It is using microwaves, a single modality to do both the image guidance and the therapy,” Stang said.This new system is proving to be a pioneering technology in the breast cancer field.“There currently aren’t any systems like that that are using a single modality to guide the focused heating,” Stang said.The team wants to be able to “cook” the cancerous tissue instead of having to surgically remove it. This will, in turn, reduce the recovery time.“The system started out as independent projects where we were doing microwave imaging,” Stang said. “The idea was to have an alternative to mammograms.”The team was motivated to provide an alternative as current mammograms use ionizing radiation, which their innovative cancer treatment would not.Microwaves are much safer than ionizing radiation, and there would be no pain or discomfort involved with the procedure since the breasts would not need to be flattened as they are in current mammograms. Instead, patients would lie down with their breasts placed in two imaging tunnels.In addition to Viterbi, the researchers will also work with the Keck School of Medicine and Dr. Eugene Chung, an M.D. who focuses more on the medical aspect of the project.Currently, the researchers have created a “laboratory prototype,” but this prototype cannot be used in a clinical setting.“We have explored contracting out a building of something that would be manufactured with a company with medical history,” Stang said. “It is more advantageous to go through a company that has the experience and the track record.”The laboratory is currently in conversation with a company in order to create the prototype.The clinical prototype will have amplifiers that lead to several antennae aimed at various angles. These antennae will allow the device to focus the microwaves on specific parts of the breast tissue, allowing the researchers to cook the cancerous tissues the way that a microwave cooks food.Stang hopes a prototype will be ready for use in a clinical setting in the next few years.last_img read more

Tony-winning alumna inspires future students

first_imgRenée Elise Goldsberry, actress, singer, and USC alumna, has become a beacon of success for the next generation of actors from USC to strive for.Goldsberry was awarded the 2016 Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical for her performances as Angelica Schuyler Church in the Broadway musical Hamilton. On June 12th, 2016, she performed at the Tony Awards ceremony along with her fellow Hamilton ensemble at the Beacon Theatre in New York.She has performed in the production since its inception, as she was cast in Hamilton’s off-Broadway debut in 2015. The show transferred to the Richard Rodgers Theatre on Broadway in August of 2015, and has seen unprecedented commercial and artistic success. Along with her praiseworthy, award-winning castmates, Goldsberry was recognized with a Grammy Award for Best Musical Theater Album for the cast recording of Hamilton. For Goldsberry’s performance, she also won a Drama Desk Award and a Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical.For students like Sasha Bartol, a music composition major who serves as an artistic director for USC’s Musical Theatre Repertory, the opportunity to see Goldsberry perform was inspiring.“I have been lucky enough to see Hamilton, and it was genuinely one of the most exciting theatrical experiences of my life,” Bartol said. “From the moment I walked through the doors, the energy was palpable, because everyone I was with was just as ecstatic to be there as I was.”Goldsberry was born in San Jose, Calif., and raised in Houston and Detroit. After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in acting from Carnegie Mellon University, she graduated from the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music, where she obtained a master’s degree in vocal jazz performance.In 2002, Goldsberry made her Broadway debut as Nala in Disney’s The Lion King. From 2005-2006, she originated the role of Nettie in the Broadway adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Color Purple. In 2007, she played the role of Mimi Marquez in the final Broadway production of Rent.She has also found great success in television and film, with recurring television roles on Ally McBeal, One Life to Live and The Good Wife. She also made an appearance in the comedic film Sisters, starring Tina Fey and Amy Poehler.At the Tony awards ceremony, Goldsberry thanked her family and castmates, noting the collaborative effort. “When one of us win, we all win, because we are one.”In her acceptance speech, she also expressed her gratitude for her family and theatrical opportunities.“I have been praying my entire time to take the opportunity to say thank you to my parents who are here tonight, Ron and Betty … a lifetime of miracles one after another…the Lord gave me Benjamin and Brielle and he still gave me this,” Goldsberry said in her acceptance with her Tony held high.Chris Sampson, USC Thornton School of Music vice dean of contemporary music, reminisced on his experiences watching Goldsberry perform at USC.“Being a very highly accomplished musician — through her studies here — was just one of the skill sets that she was going to be able to leverage,” Sampson said.Goldsberry performance in Hamilton includes songs such as, “Satisfied” and “The Schuyler Sisters,” exploring the relationship between two historical figures, Angelica Schuyler Church and Founding Father Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton — the United States first Secretary of the Treasury — was married to Angelica Schuyler’s sister, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton.“The thing about Renée’s career is that she is multitalented — that is what enables her to have the career she has,” Sampson said. “When I was observing her before, you can definitely tell she was an exceedingly charismatic performer. She really knew how to own a stage and be able to present very compelling performances.”Sampson emphasized how musicians and young artists, especially in the Master’s program, progress and develop over time.“At the time what we’re seeing with students is a work of progress,” Sampson said. “You’re actually seeing somebody start to assemble the skills that will end up resulting in a career, and you never know what the combination of those skills is going to turn out to be.”last_img read more

Sergio Ramos becomes most booked player in history of Champions League

first_imgReal Madrid captain Sergio Ramos added another feather to his cap on Wednesday but it is something he won’t be proud of.Ramos, 32, became the most booked players in the history of the Champions Leaue during Real’s clash versus AS Roma in the Group G fixture at the Santiago Bernabeu.Ramos, who hasn’t been the greatest when it comes to discipline, picked a record 37th yellow card in his 115th Champions League game. He was cautioned during the first half of Real’s 3-0 win over Roma on Wednesday.In the process, he overtook Manchester United’s Paul Scholes as the most most cautioned player in the competition. Sergio Ramos now has 37 yellow cards to his name in the Champions League (Reuters Photo)Ramos also holds the record for most yellow cards in a single Champions League campaign. He picked up five bookings during the 2010-11 and 2012-13 seasons while Scholes, who was an extremely clumsy tackler during his playing career, never earned more than four yellows in one campaign.Ramos, who has lifted Europe’s top prize on four occasions, has been sent off a record 24 times for Real Madrid, double the amount of the club’s next biggest offender, Fernando Hierro.He has also been dismissed more than any player in the history of La Liga, receiving 19 red cards in Spain’s top flight.By comparison, the Spaniard has remained relatively trouble free in the Champions League, being sent off only three times despite his considerable yellow card count.Ramos has never been sent off in 158 games for the Spanish national team.advertisement(With inputs from Reuters)last_img read more